A Change of Perspective

Snake's Head Fritillary with Aphid

Snake’s Head Fritillary with Aphid

A change of perspective can often improve your results when out shooting, as discussed by Scott Bourne in his blog post I read recently, and most photographers are well aware of this. In my case, the change in perspective isn’t to do with moving my feet, or lying down or even selecting a different lens. It’s being unable to get out as much as I normally would due to a bad back. It’s not horrendous so I shouldn’t grumble, it’s just frustrating. When I think back to spring last year, I was out 2-3 times a week in search of bluebells.

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Mist Over Iguacu Falls

Mist Over Iguacu Falls

Mist Over Iguacu Falls

I first visited Iguacu Falls in 1992 and was lucky enough to return for a second visit. It truly is a stunning area, with beautiful views all around as you move through the Brazillian and Argentine parks. Photographs really do not do it justice, you have to see it (and hear & feel it) for yourself to really appreciate how wonderful it is. There are literally hundreds of different falls, some small and some enormous.

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Australia – Sydney

Ferry & Opera House

Ferry & Opera House – 35mm; ISO 200; 1/680 sec; f/7.1 (click image to view larger size)

Australia trip part 2 (part 1 here – Blue Mountains).

Our visit to Australia started in Sydney, but we also returned there after our jaunt to the Blue Mountains and again at the end of our stay before flying home. So by the end of it, we’d grown quite accustomed to Sydney.

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Only One Little Tree

Woodland light

Woodland Light – 50mm; ISO 100; 1/125 sec; f/1.8; -1 EV (click image to view larger size)

For the last couple of years I’ve been making a series of images of a single tree. It’s a rather photogenic little beech tree set in a small but thick pine wood, with a lovely curved shape to the branches and foliage. It was certain contrasts that struck me when I first saw it. Firstly in scale, with the tall pines towering above it helping to emphasise it’s small stature. Then secondly in colour, with the muted browns of the pine trunks and woodland floor being outshone by the vibrant orange beech leaves as they held on through autumn and winter. Also, from certain viewpoints, it appeared very isolated being surrounded on all sides by tall trunks, almost penned in. Continue reading